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Top Business School U.S. News Ranking Financial Times Ranking Our Ranking
Carnegie Mellon 17 (tie) 40 16
Chicago 1 (tie) 6 4
Columbia 9 7 5
Cornell (Johnson) 15 17 12
Dartmouth (Tuck) 10 16 10
Duke (Fuqua) 11 (tie) 19 11
Emory (Goizueta) 20 (tie) 47 24
Georgetown (McDonough) 25 30 23
Harvard 1 (tie) 5 1
Indiana (Kelley) 27 57 25
Maryland (Smith) 48 55 N/A
Michigan (Ross) 7 (tie) 26 9
MIT (Sloan) 5 9 6
Northwestern (Kellogg) 6 12 7
NYU (Stern) 13 (tie) 23 13
Ohio State (Fisher) 31 68 N/A
Purdue (Krannert) 53 55 N/A
Rochester (Simon) 44 83 N/A
Stanford 4 1 2
Texas — Austin (McCombs) 17 (tie) 44 18
UC — Berkeley (Haas) 7 (tie) 10 8
UCLA (Anderson) 16 25 17
UNC (Kenan-Flagler) 19 37 19
U. Pennsylvania (Wharton) 3 3 3
USC (Marshall) 20 (tie) 59 22
Vanderbilt (Owen) 26 59 22
Virginia (Darden) 13 (tie) 32 15
Washington U. (Olin) 23 50 21
Yale 11 (tie) 15 14

Let’s start by clearly stating that we strongly encourage all of our website visitors to select the schools that are best for them. (You’re the ones who are ultimately paying for your MBA educations in terms of both tuition and time!)

We went with the US News and Financial Times rankings for our analysis as they’re both very popular and serve two slightly different audiences. The Financial Times rankings are global and they tend to give higher rankings to non-US business schools than most of us stateside probably would. Hence, a main reason so many of the schools appear to rank rather poorly.

On a side note, we find it very hard to take any ranking seriously that does not list Harvard and Stanford at one and two in either order given their graduates’ very high satisfaction rates are generally only matched by their career opportunities. And, of course, that these are the two schools that most applicants most want to attend. And, when we say “most,” we believe the number is north of 75% of the MBA applicants targeting the top business schools.